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Source cards

A source card is a good first step in creating a works cited page or a bibliography because it helps you organize your sources in a visual way.

Purposes of source cards are.. 
to document your paper. 
to complete the works cited page
to keep you organized
to help you when you create notecards


Preparing Source Cards

1. On an index card, record each source you decide to use for your paper.

2. Write down appropriate source information in the correct format depending on the type of source you are using. (i.e. a book, a website, a database, an interview, a government publication, etc.)

3.  You will transfer your source cards to your reference page (i.e works cited or bibliography)


Sample card for an article on a database
                                                                             1

Economides, Michael J. "Petroleum." World

      Book Advanced. World Book, 2014. Web.

      25 Mar. 2014.
   
Sample card for book
                                                                            2


Brown, Karen. America’s Tax Laws.  Chicago:         Prentice Hall, 1987.



Here's what your works cited page will look like with your source cards listed on it.


Basic Rules for Citations

  • For every entry, determine the Medium of Publication (i.e. print, Web) 
  • URLs for Web entries are no longer needed. However, if your instructor or publisher insists on them, include them in angle brackets after the entry and end with a period. For long URLs, break lines only at slashes. 
  • Authors' names are inverted (last name, first); if a work has more than one author, invert only the first author's name, follow it with a comma, then continue listing the rest of the authors. 
  • If you have cited more than one work by a particular author, order them alphabetically by title, and use three hyphens in place of the author's name for every entry after the first. 
  • Do not list titles (Dr., Sir, Saint, etc.) or degrees (PhD, MA, DDS, etc.) with names. A book listing an author named "John Bigbrain, PhD" appears simply as "Bigbrain, John"; do, however, include suffixes like "Jr." or "II." Putting it all together, a work by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. would be cited as "King, Martin Luther, Jr.," with the suffix following the first or middle name and a comma. 
  • If no author is given for a particular work, alphabetize by the title of the piece and use a shortened version of the title for parenthetical citations.
  • Capitalize each word in the titles of articles, books, etc. This rule does not apply to articles, short prepositions, or conjunctions unless one is the first word of the title or subtitle. 
  • Italicize titles of books, journals, magazines, newspapers, and films. 
  • Use quotation marks around the titles of articles in journals, magazines, and newspapers. Also use quotation marks for the titles of short stories, book chapters, poems, and songs. 
  • If you're citing an article or a publication that was originally issued in print form but that you retrieved from an online database, you should provide enough information so that the reader can locate the article either in its original print form or retrieve it from the online database.
  • Begin your Works Cited page on a separate page at the end of your research paper. It should have the same one-inch margins and last name, page number header as the rest of your paper.
  • Label the page Works Cited (do not italicize the words Works Cited or put them in quotation marks) and center the words Works Cited at the top of the page.
  • Double space all citations, but do not skip spaces between entries.
  • Indent the second and subsequent lines of citations by 0.5 inches to create a hanging indent.
  • List page numbers of sources efficiently, when needed. If you refer to a journal article that appeared on pages 225 through 250, list the page numbers on your Works Cited page as 225-50. Note that MLA style uses a hyphen in a span of pages.
  • For every entry, you must determine the Medium of Publication. Most entries will likely be listed as Print or Web sources, but other possibilities may include Film, CD-ROM, or DVD.
  • Writers are no longer required to provide URLs for Web entries. However, if your instructor or publisher insists on them, include them in angle brackets after the entry and end with a period. For long URLs, break lines only at slashes.
  • If you're citing an article or a publication that was originally issued in print form but that you retrieved from an online database, you should type the online database name in italics. You do not need to provide subscription information in addition to the database name.
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